Welcome back. Of course, this is just volume one: the hardest bit, on the purges and terror of the 1930s, is still to come. And this is only volume one! Kotkin’s Stalin is a striver and an autodidact of talent and determination. His revolutionary activity doesn’t amount to much. 1 - Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement. The author is obviously steeped in Russian history. Samenvatting. Zinoviev, the butt of most historians, is even worse, while Kamenev is rather unfairly dismissed as “an inveterate intriguer”. In addition, at times I could not tell why massive amounts of material was relegated to the notes or first stated in the notes and then repeated in the main text. But from Kotkin’s standpoint, Lenin is scarcely an exemplary figure. Stalin, in three volumes, tells the story of Russia’s power in the world and Stalin’s power in Russia, recast as the Soviet Union. This biography is not an etiology of evil, nor a study in power for its own sake. The first part with biographical information about Stalin's early life is quite good and thorough. I got really into this when I was reading it, and made the (admittedly obviously bad) choice to quote Stalin, A fascinating and literally useless read. By attempting to do to Stalin what Deutscher did to Trotsky, Kotkin begins by familiarising the reader with the last decades of Tasrist Russia: the world into which the figure of Stalin will emerge to assert himself. I just hope I get to keep the book forever. But I am so delighted because I have been looking for a definitive biography of Joseph Stalin for several years. Extremely detailed and LONG! Yes, it is dry and boring but definitely worth taking the time to read. Professor Kotkin’s work is an exhaustive, meticulous, academic biography of the man born December 1878 first named Ioseb Jugashvili, Soso to his family, then later known as Iosif, Koba to intimates, and, most notably, Stalin, the ‘man of steel.’ The author may have set the bar for conducting academic research; the bibliography alone is 50 pages, in triple columns, in what appears to be 5 point font, and by my rough estimate contains some 3,000 references. I've been spoiled by historical writers like Erik Larson and Ron Chernow who turn facts into stories that come alive. In truth, as Kotkin shows, Stalin was an autodidact, “a people person” with “surpassing organizational abilities; a mammoth appetite for work, [and] a strategic mind. Stalin's early life and education are explained in the historical setting of tunr-of-the century Russia. Stephen Kotkin (Author) 4.6 out of 5 stars 356 ratings. I got really into this when I was reading it, and made the (admittedly obviously bad) choice to quote Stalin in a meeting I was leading. This is interesting as a book about Stalin, but. On the contrary, he says, collectivisation was a wild gamble – a move arising out of Stalin’s conviction that Russia could not achieve socialism without doing away with small-scale peasant farming. As happened with many bright young men in late imperial Russia, Stalin’s aspirations for betterment got deflected into the revolutionary movement. By Stephen Kotkin Allen Lane, 976pp, £30.00 ISBN 9780713999440 Published 30 October 2014 stalin volume i paradoxes of power 1878 1928 Dec 10, 2020 Posted By Ken Follett Media Publishing TEXT ID 644471c6 Online PDF Ebook Epub Library penguin press share twitter facebook email a superbly researched tour de force of pre and post revolutionary russian history told through the life of joseph stalin shortly Now finally we see the crux of Kotkin’s interpretation: Stalin was a man acting out of deeply held ideological convictions whose actions are only understandable in these terms, not in terms of maximisation of personal power. He is now the ruler of the largest country in the world, but a poor and backward one, far behind the great capitalist countries in industrial and military power, encircled on all sides. The rudeness was to Lenin’s wife, Nadezhda Krupskaya, and Kotkin follows the Russian historian Valentin Sakharov in suggesting that she or others in the household, not the stricken Lenin, were the actual authors of these documents. Feints in the form of tactical retreats notwithstanding, he would keep going even when told to his face by officials in the inner regime that a catastrophe was unfolding – full speed ahead to socialism.”. I was so engrossed I actually spilled an entire cup of coffee onto page twenty-three. A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world. The reality is simply that Trotsky was outclassed at every turn by an exceptionally canny and highly intelligent rival. Free 2-day shipping on qualified orders over $35. An epic microhistory of tyranny in embryo. Alles van Stephen Kotkin Toon meer Toon minder. Then came the miracle: the collapse of the Tsarist autocracy in February 1917. The context of Russia's geopolitical situation gives context to young Stalin's life. Trotsky established the image of Stalin as a sinister mediocrity, who nonetheless outmaneuvered Trotsky through his utter lack of scruples. $12.99. Unlike a number of Stalin studies, this is not an etiology of evil. ## eBook Stalin Volume I Paradoxes Of Power 1878 1928 ## Uploaded By Eleanor Hibbert, stalin paradoxes of power 1878 1928 is the first volume in a three volume series of tomes on the life of the soviet dictator iosef soso jugashvili aka joseph stalin by the eminent princeton professor of history and international affairs stephen kotkin NOOK Book. $40.00. On the contrary, Kotkin writes, Stalin made history, “rearranging the entire socioeconomic landscape of one sixth of the earth”, and his case “reveals how, on extremely rare occasions, a single individual’s decisions can radically transform an entire country’s political and socioeconomic structures, with global repercussions”. Moral philosophers may be needed to straighten this out, but my own feeling is that the premise is wrong: evil, as a quality of a person, is not quantifiable, and we can’t obtain an index through multiplication. You can only make the portrait work, as John Milton did in Paradise Lost, by showing the cracks and contradictions that make the monster (his Satan) human. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 was originally published in October 2017 by Penguin Random House (Hardcover and Kindle), and as an audiobook in December 2017 by Recorded Books, and was … Stalin: Paradoxes Of Power, 1878-1928 Vol. Stalin's early life and education are explained in the historical setting of tunr-of-the century Russia. As for Stalin, he was out in Siberian exile “battling mosquitos and boredom” for much of the last imperial decade, and thus missed the first world war. Start by marking “Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928” as Want to Read: Error rating book. I am sorry, I don’t know. The first in a planned epic trilogy. You can only make the portrait work, as, work is often cited in the early Soviet chapters. “Absolute evil” is not a useful concept, at least from the standpoint of a biographer. The text it totally illegible. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. But revolutionaries, or leaders who still have revolutionary transformation on their mind, think they fall into that category of exemption, too. Professor Kotkin admits he’s up to more than the person; he’s written a Russian period history, doubling as biography. “Absolute evil” is not a useful concept, at least from the standpoint of a biographer. This biography is not an etiology of evil, nor a study in power for its own sake. We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928: Kotkin Stephen: Amazon.nl Selecteer uw cookievoorkeuren We gebruiken cookies en vergelijkbare tools om uw winkelervaring te verbeteren, onze services aan te bieden, te begrijpen hoe klanten onze services gebruiken zodat we verbeteringen kunnen aanbrengen, en om advertenties weer te geven. He tries to look at him at various stages of his career without the benefit of too much hindsight. Stalin, Vol. In some ways the book builds toward a history of the world from Stalin’s office (at least that is what it has felt like to write it). I wasn’t advocating for Staline. Not sure what to do with all that Staline. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. I learned more about Stalin than I probably ever needed to know about his early years. Stephen Kotkin’s first volume in a three-part study of Stalin is both exhaustive and exhausting Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 by Kotkin, Stephen at AbeBooks.co.uk - ISBN 10: 1594203792 - ISBN 13: 9781594203794 - Penguin Press - 2014 - Hardcover Stalin, Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 976. by Stephen Kotkin | Editorial Reviews. His answer is that “if Stalin had died, the likelihood of forced wholesale collectivisation – the only kind – would have been near zero, and the likelihood that the Soviet regime would have been transformed into something else or fallen apart would have been high”. Stephen Kotkin, whose first book, Magnetic Mountain (1995), had the bold subtitle “Stalinism as a Civilisation”, is not one to shrink before challenges. Stalin Paradoxes Of Power 1878 1928.pdf book «Stalin Volume I Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928», I finally have a good one. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. From repressive Russian imperial policy in Georgia and elsewhere to the Russian autocracy's inability to reform and keep up with European powers, to the outbreak of the First World War and how it precipitated the Russian revolution, to a meticulous breakdown of how the Bolsheviks (and Lenin in particular) browbeated, subdued and eliminated all other revolutionary forces in the country. Kotkin finishes this first volume with Stalin's consolidation of power as the de facto dictator of the Soviet Union and at the point where he embarks on his greatest political gambit: the collectivization of agriculture. Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, with Stephen Kotkin Books by Kotkin [amazon template=thumbnail&asin=0143127861] ... started World War I, helped bring Stalin to power. The context of Russia's geopolitical situation gives context to young Stalin's life. Stalin - Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 Volume I Paperback Engels 2015 9780141027944. The standard story says the grain procurements crisis of 1927 made it necessary for the Bolsheviks to take radical action. This diligence comes at a cost in readability - what a difference between Robert Caro’s works and this one. Kotkin explodes many other myths in this superlative volume, but none more enduring that the one that Trotsky created. A series of strokes put Lenin out of action in the two years before his death in January 1924, and a covert succession struggle began with Stalin and Trotsky as first-round contenders. This is a ponderous tome (950 pages with notes and it is only volume 1). Those states, in turn, forced other countries to attain modernity as well, or suffer the consequences, including defeat in war and possible colonial conquest.”, “Revolutions are like earthquakes: they are always being predicted, and sometimes they come.”, Pulitzer Prize Nominee for Biography or Autobiography (2015), Arthur Ross Book Award for Silver Medal (2015). Amazon.in - Buy Stalin, Vol. Learn more. He is an engaging interlocutor with a sharp, irreverent wit that compensates for a few longueurs in his leisurely narrative, making the book a good read as well as an original and largely convincing interpretation of Stalin that should provoke lively arguments in the field. The first part with biographical information about Stalin's early life is quite good and thorough. He often defends Stalin from Trotsky's and other's criticism, showing how they were false. To create our... To see what your friends thought of this book. “What we designate modernity was not something natural or automatic. Verwachte levertijd ongeveer 10 werkdagen 23,90 In … I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 01 by Kotkin, Stephen (ISBN: 9780141027944) from Amazon's Book Store. I learned about this book from Anne Applebaum's excellent article in The Atlantic - it's the first volume of a planned trilogy, which has all the potential to become the definite work on Stalin. Kotkin makes a refreshingly clear distinction between who Stalin was and who were the other key Communist figures, as misguided and flawed as they were as human beings. In his final chapter, Kotkin tackles the question that is often asked but seldom answered: what if there had been no Stalin? In other words, EH Carr is “utterly, eternally wrong” in saying that “Stalin illustrates the thesis that circumstances make the man, not the man the circumstances”. Mind you. Mr. Kotkin allows detail to substitute for analysis. Is it Kotkin, an invisible watcher, who has quietly drawn up a chair next to Stalin at his desk? Nor was there anything necessary about sticking to all-out collectivisation through thick and thin. Skip to main content.sg. Stalin: Vol. Stalin's rivalry with Trotsky, Lenin's death and his purported final will to 'remove Stalin', and the how Stalin ultimately outmaneuvered Trotsky (with great help of none other than Trotsky himself, who according to Kotkin "organized his own opposition") comprise perhaps the most fascinating chapters of the book. I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 book reviews & author details and more at Amazon.in. The assumption that the man who kills (or causes to be killed) a million people is a million times more evil than the man who kills one is another stumbling block. Only Aleksei Rykov and sometime finance commissar Grigory Sokolnikov look relatively good, although not as potential leaders because they had no organised factions behind them. That happened because “right through mass rebellion, mass starvation, cannibalism, the destruction of the country’s livestock, and unprecedented political destabilisation, Stalin did not flinch. Solid facts; boring as hell. If you want to know a whole lot about Stalin, Russia, the Soviet Union and how dictatorships emerge, this might be for you. He tells us, however, that “accident in history is rife”, dropping a clue that this is not going to be a story of historical inevitability or psychological determinism. The figure that catches the eye in these early chapters is Pyotr Durnovo, Nicholas II’s interior minister, who saved the empire after the 1905 revolution by savage repression. I won an advance copy of this book from a goodreads drawing. We’d love your help. Cart All. Superb first volume of a projected three volume series. He may be right about the Depression, though I’d like to see it argued through with evidence rather than simply asserted. Revolutionaries like Stalin could claim little credit, but they were beneficiaries. A fascinating and literally useless read. I want to keep this short—there are a lot of good, substantive review out there. But what scholars haven’t seen, or at least explicitly acknowledged, is its significance for an understanding of Stalin and his motives, namely that it makes the argument that he was in it just for personal power untenable. Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 by Stephen Kotkin review – personality proves decisive. Once 1917 comes, however, the last two-thirds of the book turn into a sterile analysis of internal Communist party politics with no connection to the wider society at all. Unfortunately I have not been able to really concentrate or delve too deeply into this book because I have a huge editing job that has occupied a lot of my time. Trotsky was not simply “relentlessly condescending” and a poor political strategist, but “just not the leader people thought he was, or that Stalin turned out to be … Stalin’s abilities and resolve were an order of magnitude greater”. Stalin, Vol. Find all the books, read about the author and more. • Sheila Fitzpatrick has just completed her book on Stalin and the leadership team, which, formed in the 1920s, largely survived three tumultuous decades and outlived him. That’s Stalin’s Siberian—Three years in Siberia during World War I, eight houses, sixty-seven people on the Arctic Circle, that’s him in the back with the hat on in Siberia. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 is the second volume in an extensive three-volume biography of Joseph Stalin by American historian and Princeton Professor of History Stephen Kotkin. One of my favourite biographical series, especially if you want to know more about turn of the century, Tzarist Russia, and the Russian Revolution, one of the most important events in history of our time. Comrades in the United States produced a nice podcast episode about Kotkin's Stalin series that could be listened here: Kotkin is a leading Russian historian and author of a well-received book about everyday life under Stalin, so his biography of the man himself can be expected to be deeply researched, comprehensive, and groundbreaking. Between all of these developments, Stalin emerges from his (extremely) marginal role as a communist agitator and exiled political revolutionary, to the disciple and ultimately indispensable torch-bearer of Lenin and Marxism-Leninism. The life of a once-promising young man seemed on the road to nowhere. That’s a tricky decision for the author. Kotkin drops another clue here, remarking that this was a moment “in the play of large-scale historical structures when personality proved decisive: a lesser interior minister could not have managed”. Stalin: Volume 1: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928. From the very first chapters, Kotkin demonstrates his uncompromising commitment to the great historical contingencies surrounding the life of Stalin. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Stalin: Paradoxes of Power 1878–1928 User Review - Book Verdict. " Read Stalin Volume I Paradoxes Of Power 1878 1928 " Uploaded By Harold Robbins, stalin paradoxes of power 1878 1928 is the first volume in a three volume series of tomes on the life of the soviet dictator iosef soso jugashvili aka joseph stalin by the eminent princeton professor of history and international affairs stephen kotkin stalin That the outcome was something short of complete disaster was simply his good luck, in Kotkin’s interpretation: the Great Depression made western powers more (rather than, as others have argued, less) interested in economic cooperation with the Soviet Union. Paperback. What newly anointed leader for whom maintenance of power was the main objective would have risked such a step? Having given us a human character, albeit one whose menace is growing, how will Kotkin handle the menace full-blown in volume two? His expansive study is just the first of a projected three volumes. I view the final 2/3 of this book as a chronicle rather than a history. Incredibly detailed account of Stalin’s early life and rise to power. Perhaps the only reasonable way to handle the problem analytically is to postulate what has been called a Power Amplification Factor – if you’re Joe Blow, your actions, however murderous, tend to be relatively local and quantitatively limited in their impact, but if you’re Stalin or Hitler, you get the global impact and multiples in the millions. But I am so delighted because I have been looking for a definitive biography of Joseph Stalin for several years. This reads more like an undergraduate term paper. Account & Lists Account Returns & Orders. There were setbacks and difficulties as he was growing up, but Kotkin dismisses the idea of childhood trauma: lots of people, including many fellow revolutionaries, had it worse. Ambitious in scale, this is the first of a 3 volume long Stalin biography. But it landed with the attendees like I was a fan, and went down hill from there. It’s an expansive interpretation of context, and one of the effects is to make the young Stalin, born in obscurity on the periphery of the Russian empire, look pretty small. At any rate, the message seems to be that in the intimate relationship between biographer and subject, this biographer is keeping the upper hand. Free delivery on qualified orders. Volume One of Stalin begins and ends in January 1928 as Stalin boards a train bound for Siberia, about to embark upon the greatest gamble of his political life. Will he try to keep Stalin human or let him morph into a monster? I'd just like to mention a couple of takeaways I had from the book. Buy Now. 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